Elon Musk and Jussie Smollett Have the Same Problem

Poor Elon Musk, he just can’t get enough attention. Apparently, Jussie Smollett has the same problem.

Good thing for one of them there’s a difference between them.

In terms of their crimes, in Smollett’s case the wrongdoing is alleged, while in Musk’s case he signed his own admission.

I’m not interested in Jussie Smollett’s big part on a waning show on the small screen or his small life off-screen and his desire to be on TMZ, which turned into national news.

But I am very interested to see if the TMZ-lite of Wall Street, the SEC, slaps Elon Musk on the wrist again for his latest crime – or does its job properly, once and for all.

You can follow the Smollett saga on TV (be careful what you wish for, Jussie).

But you’re not going to get the “inside edition” of what’s happening with Tesla Inc. (NasdaqGS:TSLA), what could happen to Musk, and how you can make money on the situation anywhere…

Except for right here at Wall Street Insights & Indictments.

Let’s dive in…


What the New JPMorgan Cryptocurrency Means for the Price of Bitcoin

The price of bitcoin rose 8.6% from the end of last week to yesterday, February 18, on news that JPMorgan Chase & Co. (NYSE:JPM) was launching the first-ever major bank-backed cryptocurrency, JPM Coins.

Apparently, after Jamie Dimon, JPMorgan Chase’s chairman and CEO, called bitcoin a “fraud,” saying in October 2017, “If you’re stupid enough to buy it, you’ll pay the price for it one day,” the big bank honcho has had second thoughts.

Something changed for Dimon and JPMorgan Chase, and today I’ll tell you what a bank coming to market with its own coin means for bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies – and it isn’t what you think.

Later, I’ll show you how you to learn more about bitcoin – and maybe it’ll help you form an opinion on the controversial cryptocurrency


Europe’s Canary in the Coal Mine is About to Croak

Deutsche Bank Aktiengesellschaft (NYSE:DB)’s “troubles” aren’t just a concern for the survival of Germany’s largest bank; they’re the same troubles most European banks face.

Frighteningly, those troubles collectively threaten the future of the European Union and, by extension, global markets.

That makes Deutsche Bank Europe’s canary in the coal mine.

Bond and equity markets better be listening to the chirping noise coming from Frankfurt, because it’s getting louder.

Let’s talk about what’s ailing Deutsche Bank and what DB tells us about other European banks. Then we’ll get into how the European Central Bank (ECB) is the common thread in their flawed knitting, and what could happen to bond and equity markets if the canary croaks.

And, later, I’ll show you a way you can make money no matter what the ever-evolving market conditions are


Buybacks Aren’t Inherently Evil, But…

Last week, senators Chuck Schumer (D. NY) and Bernie Sanders of (D. VT) co-authored an opinion piece in the New York Times titled, “Limit Corporate Buybacks” with the subtitle “Corporate self-indulgence has become an enormous problem for workers and for the long-term strength of the economy.”

They’re right that buybacks should be limited, but wrong about their impact on workers and the economy.

So, today I’ll tell you what the senators got right, what they got wrong, and how buybacks should be treated.

But before we dive right in, let me share a quick tidbit on how you can get your share of a multi-billion cash pool


European Growth is Slowing, Quickly: Look Out Below

Growth across the European Union is slowing, quickly and dramatically. On top of that, Brexit looms.

For interest rates, the euro, European stock markets, and Eurozone banks, that means, look out below.

Something’s happening across Europe, and you need to be aware.

Things could get bad, and you need to know where to take cover.

Here’s what’s you need to know, and what you can do in the meantime to potentially profit…


“I’m From the Federal Reserve and I’m Here to Help”

Most Americans would probably agree, if the Federal Reserve hadn’t come to the rescue in the 2008 financial crisis, the United States (and the world) would have sunk into another Great Depression.

However, most Americans don’t realize that the Fed caused the financial crisis of 2008 by keeping interest rates artificially too low for too long, fostering “irrational exuberance” and insanely leveraged mortgage bubbles.

How do you know I’m telling you the truth?

Ask yourself two questions:

  1. What caused the financial crisis?
  2. Where was ground zero?

If you don’t immediately and automatically, instinctively and historically know the answers to both questions, I’m afraid you don’t know what you don’t know.

That’s why I’m here, to lift the veil that’s been so carefully and expertly placed over your eyes so you don’t even know it’s there, and to tell you the truth – because no one else will


The Fed’s Announced Triple Mandate is the Final Nail in the Free Market’s Coffin

The Federal Reserve System, the privately-owned central bank that most Americans believe is a department of the U.S. government, just publicly gave itself the last hammer it needs to nail shut the coffin they shoved free markets into.

By admitting it’s going to “think about financial conditions,” meaning the stock market, when exercising control over interest rates, the Federal debt, consumer and producer prices, employment, the economy, and investor returns, the Fed cemented its position as chief of the new command economy.

Here’s what happened, what you didn’t see happening, and what it means for the future of America’s capitalist democracy


The Stock Market Needs Another Exchange Like It Needs a Hole in the Head

As if thirteen so-called “exchanges” and forty “dark pools” aren’t enough, here comes the Members Exchange (MEMX).

Founding members of Bank of America’s Merrill Lynch, Morgan Stanley, UBS Group, Charles Schwab, TD Ameritrade, E*Trade Financial, Fidelity Investments, Citadel Securities, and Virtu Financial claim the new trading venue slated to open in 2020 will feature lower costs, greater transparency, and simplified order types.

Seems all well and good, but what they’re never going to admit is why they’re really pushing another exchange into an already fragmented, liquidity draining, churning ocean of viciously competing trading venues.

But I’ll tell you.

And you might not like the truth


IBM is Going Right Back to the Dump Where it Belongs

On Wednesday, shares of International Business Machines Corp. (NYSE:IBM) jumped more than 10% on its better-than-expected earnings report.

The stock closed at $133.34, up 8.8% on the day.

Calling that remarkable is like calling the Grand Canyon a ditch.

It’s remarkably ridiculous, because IBM is the worst managed company in America – and its stock is heading right back where it belongs, in the garbage heap.

And if you play your cards right, you could make a quick killing as it falls


How Do Ya Like Them Apples? Here’s Why This This Company Went Rotten

Poor, tarnished Apple Inc. (NasdaqGS:AAPL).

It did everything right for decades, making itself the first company in the history of the world to be worth one trillion dollars.

Then it fell off analysts’ conviction buy lists, and Apple’s stock got hammered good and hard.

What suddenly happened to the most valuable company in the world? How could it lose almost $300 billion in value in a matter of weeks?

Truthfully, what happened to Apple was mostly its own fault. Sure enough, it got caught up (or down as the case may be) in the market’s October selloff, but that wasn’t unexpected.

In hindsight, Apple held up better than the market last October and better than its FAANG family members did.

What took the shine right off the most valuable company in the world, after its all-time high of $233.47 in October, was the company’s announcement on November 1, 2018, not a month after its high water score, that it would no longer breakout iPhone sales in its earnings.

The stock got hammered – hard.

That self-inflicted wound, some say death knell, happened just as the Dow Jones Industrial Average, which had traded down close to 24,000 at the end of October, began a robust rally.

Only a week and a half into November, the Dow got back above 26,000.

Apple, not so much. In fact, not at all. Apple stock continued to slide, like it was falling off Everest.

The stock traded down to $142, just shy of a 40% dump off its high-flying act.

It’s back up around $155 today.

Is Apple at $155 or just below there a “value” stock? Is it a bargain down by more than 33%?

Or, is Apple too full of worms and worth betting against?

Here’s why the stock really tanked, what Apple should do to fix the mess it created, and why you should be in its corner AND bet against it at the same time


BROUGHT TO YOU BY MANWARD PRESS